How Preschool Can Help Children Socialize

Friends reading together

Friends reading together

Many concepts are learned as children attend preschool. They learn to make decisions and choices as they decide what to do, and who to play with.  Social skills are a very important part of growing up, and are a big factor to why children attend preschool.  As children begin to communicate with others, it helps them develop language as they interact with the other children and teachers.  I have had parents tell me how pleased they are when their children express new words and tell them of a new experience they’ve had at school, including songs they have learned or a special friend they have made.  Preschool is a safe place to learn how to make friends as children watch other children interact and play together with educated, loving teachers around to help them master social skills.

Friends in sandbox

Friends in sandbox

When children attend preschool they also learn how to take turns and share toys. Concepts that include communicating and to “use their words” to ask for a turn, instead of grabbing for things, is a vital lesson children must be taught to gain friendships and to get along well with other children. Children learn all types of communication skills throughout their life, but what they learn as a young child, will give them the foundations which are necessary for future experiences as they attend kindergarten, elementary school and beyond.

Sharing and playing together

Sharing and playing together

My book Molly Goes to Preschool presents how some typical 3 and 4-year-old children participate in a preschool program. When I was a preschool teacher, my classroom was set up as illustrated in the book with; cubbies for personal belonging, a large rug area for building with block or other building materials and for circle time, an art area, a dramatic play area with a child size kitchen, and a science area.  We also we had a large playground with a sand area, a climbing structure, a few tables for books and other small toys, and an area for bikes and balls.

Preschool classroom

Preschool classroom

A part of the story, the teacher dismisses the children from “circle time” as she names a color they are wearing.  I used this method myself many times to excuse the children in smaller groups to avoid confusion.  This is not only a way to help the children learn colors; it can help them improve skills in; listening, following directions and develop patience.   In the story, little Molly is a little scared to be in the new situation of attending preschool.  She realizes another child is also scared.  Children learn that others may have the same fears and emotions as they do as they go to preschool or other places where other children are.  Children have great empathy for each other and want to reach out to help each other.  As a parent and teacher, I have seen many children help other children overcome their fears or worries as they invite them to play and participate in activities.  I included the feelings of being scared and a demonstration how another child befriends Molly in the book since this is what can really happen in preschool and children can be comforted by the examples of others.

Having fun on the slide

Having fun on the slide

I would love your feedback on what your children have learned from attending preschool!  Did their language skills improve?  Have they learned to share and make friends?  Do you think they would have learned these skills without going to preschool?

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13 thoughts on “How Preschool Can Help Children Socialize

  1. This was such a wonderful post, thanks so much for letting us in on the premise of your book. Gigi i not at preschool age yet but this sounds like such an excellent way of introducing the concepts you detailed, before she attends to help ease her in. Thanks so much for linking in to the Kid Lit Blog Hop.
    Cheers Julie Grasso (Hostess)

  2. Molly Goes to Preschool sounds like a great book. My children were worried and frightened to be going to preschool – a book like this would have helped them. Preschool was a positive experience for them – being with other children (and adults), making friends, and experimenting with different classroom materials. I stopped by from the Kid Lit Blog Hop.

  3. DD went to preschool and we both have very fond memories of her time there. The school taught her independence and respect. She learned to read and write and has grown to love learning.And yes, she made a lot of good friends there and learned that friends needed time alone as well time together 🙂
    I can not say enough good things about her school.. this post just brought back very fond memories! Thanks for sharing this on Kid Lit Blog Hop!

  4. I think you nailed it on the head with all the skills kids learn when they attend preschool. Often, it is a child’s introduction to having another adult as an authority figure (outside of relatives), having to interact and compromise with other children, and so many other things. Your book sounds so lovely – thank you for sharing your post in the Kid Lit Blog Hop.

  5. Pingback: Parents express concerns about levels on their children’s preschool and reception class reports | Psychologymum

  6. Pingback: review – Molly Goes to Preschool by Cynthia Andrews | Kid Lit Reviews

    • I really appreciate your honest review. It is a first book and as I said, I learn by my mistakes. It was way to wordy with to many details not needed to tell the story. Hope you will like my next book.

  7. Everything is very open with a really clear explanation of the issues. It was truly informative. Your website is very helpful. Many thanks for sharing!|

  8. Pingback: 5 Ways to Make School Fun | Hilltop Children's Center

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