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10 Rules for Parents with Children in Child Care

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Many parents are working, or just want their child to attend a preschool or a childcare center. An informed parent will be more comfortable leaving their precious child with others.  The teachers and parents need to form a partnership for the best care of each child. The list of rules below can help keep the transition process go smoothly.

 1. Read all notices and newsletters to keep informed of what is going on in the childcare center.

Examples; notes from teachers or director about special items needed,

Toys for share day, field trips, visitors, holiday or other closed days.

2. Let the teachers know if your child has been ill.

This could explain certain behaviors, attitudes or being lethargic.

3.  Let the teachers know if there has been a change in child’s life.

Example; death in the family, separation of parents, new baby, (this too

will help understand a change of behavior in the child.)

4. Sign your child in and out every day on the sign in sheet.

Not only is it mandated by the state, it is needed in emergency situations.

5. Put your child’s name on all items brought to the preschool.

This will help with lost or duplicate items, the child does not always know what is theirs.

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freedigitalphots.net

6. Communicate with Director with concerns or problems with staff or other children.

The Director is there to provide the best experience for each family

and form a positive partnership to ensure the best care for each child.

7. Make sure child has extra clothes, blanket for naps, diapers and other necessary items.

The teachers need these to provide the best care for the child.

8. Be the boss of your child; do not let them manipulate you!

Especially at drop off and when you pick them up.

9. Show interest in all your child’s work.

The child is proud of their accomplishments and will strive

to become better students when parents show an interest.

10.  Help with fundraisers and pay tuition in a timely manner.

Most centers and preschools need funding to provide a quality program.

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free digitalphots.net

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The Different Stages of Play and Social Development

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When I observe the children at the childcare center, I see many different types of play going on.  These are the stages all children go through as they grow from infancy on. Although some children at any age may watch and play by themselves, the children usually follow these steps of development as they learn social skills and how to interact with other children.

ONLOOKER OR OBSERVANT PLAY

In the infant room, the babies crawl around, find a toy and put it in their mouths.  Then they may sit up and just look around at the other babies but not interact with each other, although one baby may try to take a toy from another.  This is the first stage of play.  The babies are beginning to notice what is around them, as they explore their environment.

 

courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

SOLITARY PLAY

As babies grow and begin to walk, they continue to explore their environment and start to experiment with items they can control with their hands.  (This is the time to child proof your house!)  They learn cause and effect as they dump out a box of toys to see how they spill all over the floor, push a ball to see it roll, or press buttons on a toy to hear it play music or other sounds. Young toddlers tend to play by themselves, even if they are in a room with others.

PARALLEL PLAY

As the children grow and start to become more observant of others around them, they often are seen sitting or running around together but not really directly interacting with each other.  They may sit side-by-side doing a puzzle, push trains or cars on the floor, look at books independently or build with blocks without involving each other in their play.

ASSOCIATIVE PLAY

This is seen in most preschool classrooms or playground.  Children begin to interact with each other while they play in the dramatic play area pretending to make a meal and serve it to each other, they may look at a book together and talk about the pictures or play in the sandbox together.  This is the age that the children learn to socialize, share and develop friendships.  They communicate about what they are doing and invite others to join them.

 

photo from c. andrews

photo from c. andrews

COOPERATIVE PLAY

I see this going on everyday with the older children at the center who are going to kindergarten in the fall. During the outside time they create some very structured, organized play.  They create racecar games, become transformers, or super heroes. It is interesting to see who the leaders are.  The leader will tell the others the idea he or she has planned and tells the others what their part of the plan will be.  This stage the children work together as they plan their play or build a grand city using blocks and other props.

If you get a chance to observe children, watch and listen to the way they interact with each other.  It is fascinating to see the exchange of ideas as they learn to cooperate and socialize with each other.  Children need a chance to play with other children around their same age to develop the skills necessary to be able to communicate well with others as they grow.

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Is your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

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Is my child ready for kindergarten?

This is a question many parents ask.  With the high standards for kindergarten, many early childhood teachers are happy about the new age requirements to start kindergarten.  Check out www.teachingfirst.net to see the standards for California.

The Kindergarten Readiness act of 2010 for California has changed the entry age into kindergarten to be 5 years old.  The 2013-2014 school year the cut off date is October 2nd, which means the child must be 5 before October 2 to be eligible for a regular kindergarten program.  Next school year, 2014-2015, the cut off date will be September 2nd.  Check out www.cde.ca.gov for a better understanding of the Kindergarten Readiness Act with the FAQ page.

The school districts now offer a Transitional Kindergarten program for the fall birthdays that are not old enough for the regular kindergarten.  This year the child must be having their 5th birthday between October 2nd and December 2nd.  Next year it will be September 2nd through December 2nd.

Age is one ingredient for school readiness, but being socially, emotionally and physically ready are very important too.  A quality preschool program that stresses social learning through play is a proven factor in getting children ready for Kindergarten.  Children must learn how to communicate with others, follow directions, share and play well with others.  Being able to separate from mom and dad without fears and tears is a good sign of being emotionally ready. Also children also need to be physically ready for kindergarten by being able to take care of their own bathroom needs (buttons and zippers), be able to hold pencils and cut with scissors.Most good preschool programs will help children develop these skills as the children interact and play together.  Children learn while they play!

There are many great webpages with tips on getting your child ready for kindergarten on the web.  Just Google kindergarten readiness and see what comes up.  Next time you are surfing the web check out a few of my favorite blog and websites: 123kindergarten.com, mamasmiles.com and familyeducation.com.

Happy surfing!

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What Parents Should Avoid when Children First Start School

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For many parents leaving their child at school for the first time is an emotional roller coaster.  They may feel excited and delighted that their child will start school but also feel apprehensive about leaving them.  In my experience as a teacher and director for young children, many parents have a much more difficult time leaving their child at school then the child has in going. It is quite often that I have seen moms (and dads too) go out the front door with tears in their eyes.

 ID-10063156As a parent, it is natural to feel a sense of loss when you separate from your child, just as the child does.  It is best to prepare your child, and yourself, for the separation.  Read books about going to school with your child. For example, Molly Goes to Preschool.

Do your research and find a preschool or daycare center you will feel comfortable leaving your child in.  I recommend to my new parents to visit the school a few times with your child to help them become familiar with it.  Start out with the child staying a shorter time without you for the first few times they go, then work up to the regular time.

I have created a list of what not to do as a parent when leaving your child for the first time at school. These are a few techniques that I recommend to my new families when they first start their child in the center.

DO NOT:

  • Cry in front of your child – it is better to stay upbeat and positive so your child will be less apprehensive about staying, (you can cry after you leave)
  • Sneak out – it is better to say goodbye and let your child know that you are leaving and will be back soon
  • Show your nervousness – your child is sensitive to your feelings and may pick up your discomfort and be worried and scared
  • Hang around after you say good-bye – even if your child is crying, it only prolongs the separation
  • Apologize to your child for leaving them at school – this will send them a message that you are doing something wrong
  • Miss days of attendance – except if the child is ill.  It is best to establish a routine so the child can get use to going to school consistently
  • Let your child manipulate you.  Children can learn to manipulate you at a young age and make you feel guilty when they cry.  Understand that they are scared, but assure them they are safe and you will return to get them.

This list may help the transition to school go a little more smoothly.  Most of all remember that you are the parent and you know what is best for your own child.

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How to Ease Children into School With Books

In my experiences with young children, I found they really enjoy being read to. I created this story (“Molly Goes to Preschool”) as entertainment as well as something preschool children can relate to in their lives. Many children are afraid of new experiences, new places, being away from their mommy, and new people. I know that if children are well prepared for changes they can accept them with less anxieties (I am sure you’ve heard of stranger anxieties and separation anxieties!).

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How to Ease Children into School through Books

With a story like “Molly Goes to Preschool,” a child just starting preschool can get a better understanding of how other children deal with fears they may have. By having examples of what they will experience, as well as reactions to these experiences, a child has something to relate to or recall when they are put in a similar situation. When a child learns trust and that mommy comes back they will feel less fearful about the new situation.

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I have over twenty years of experience working with child development and education. The situations and environments the children face and are exposed to in “Molly Goes to Preschool” are based off of my experiences. While no situation can be predicted perfectly, above all it is most important to simply talk to your child, reassure your child and be present for your child.

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